PR Wars Podcast: Eyes of a TV photog

Through the eyes of a TV photog. They’ve seen it all in television news and they are the unheralded backbone of news gathering. As a PR pro, the right connection with a tv videographer can make your story soar.  

On today’s PR Wars podcast, we talk with 30-year television pro Stewart Pittman. A little respect can go a long way to helping you capture the best news hit of your career.

A.I. generated show transcript: “We want the truth.” “We want the truth.” “We want the truth.” “I have news for everybody. Get over it.”

Announcer
It’s time. Welcome to PR Wars coming at you live from Atlanta, Georgia. Now, here is your host… Chris Shigas.

Chris Shigas
Hello, everyone. I’m Chris Shigas.

And thank you for listening to PR Wars through the eyes of a photog. They’ve seen it all in television news, and they are the unheralded backbone of news gathering. And as a PR Pro, the right connection with a TV videographer can make your story soar. And before we introduce our guests, I want to say hello to the PR Wars co host and fellow communications Imagineer Brad Grantham. Now our next guest is a 30 year survivor of local television news. He’s covered hurricanes and Hollywood and more homicides than he can even recall. And as a photojournalist, he writes, edits and solo produces TV news stories every day. And he’s dealt with PR folks like us, and he champions the smart PR pros, but he steers clear of the Spin Doctors, the ones with an agenda, but without a clue. Stewart Pittman, thank you so much for joining us on PR wars today.

Stewart Pittman
Thanks for having me.

Chris Shigas
Through your viewpoint, as a photojournalist, videographer, photographer, as you approach a variety of events, you probably when you walk in the door, you already know this is going to be a good event or not. Right? What are some of those telltale signs,

Stewart Pittman
it’s set up some sort of thought put into where the podium is and not being pushed up against a plate glass window with the big factory making noise making socks in the background. Everyone who’s covered any kind of news, any kind of press conference has seen that kind of thing. All the time. PR people the best are these just invisible facilitators who who kind of pushed little chunks of content at you, as if you’re a guest at a party, and they’re not trying to be the center of the room, they’re only trying to make sure you have a good time. Whereas on the other end of the spectrum, it’s it’s like a well meaning helicopter parent who is getting in the way of all the natural camera moments that happen. When I think of the people I think of everyone from the Pio officer at the public school system to the the movie star handler on the red carpet. So it’s a wide spectrum, right? And much like news crews can be a wide spectrum of experience and motive and objectivity. So can PR people. And I probably didn’t answer your question, but but feel free to ask them.

Brad Grantham
No, we’ll get back to that. But you talk about experience. You’ve been doing this for network affiliates. For what 30 years at this point over 30 years.

Stewart Pittman
Right around 30. Yeah.

Brad Grantham
So from when you started back in the 80s. To now, what has your career been like? And what are the biggest changes that you have seen from a photographer and photography standpoint?

Stewart Pittman
Well, technology has gotten so much better news crews have have been reduced by one person that’s not very often the news crew personal one, that was always the case somewhat in local television. But the advanced technology has made that just so much easier. cameras have gotten weaker and smaller and plastic and easier to use. And it has slowly precluded the dedicated technician and has made everything just even a little more shallower than it was back in the 80s. And it was really pretty shallow then, I guess the most surprising thing in my time and television is the margin technology. I was in television before the internet. I remember phone books and fat I remember when fax machines revolutionary. You remember actual maps. I remember teletype machines

Chris Shigas
that’s how fax machines was how we used to send press releases, right enter and that would that would go right into the day folder.

Stewart Pittman
It would the physical actual copy the carry from the fax machine to the file. I joke I have some 25 year old reporters, and I try not to go step that on them but they don’t believe it. And when I listen to myself explain how we used to do things.

It doesn’t even sound real, you know, try explaining to a 25 year old how you used to go to the bus station after lunch, to pick up the tape that was put on the bus from 45 minutes down the road so you can edit it, TV has gotten easier. You know, what used to be a big light truck that was hard to park and hard to operate is now a magic backpack with one button. So don’t let anyone tell you it’s harder. So that’s a lot easier, but the expectations are are harder. And that kind of evens everything else. You know, one thing I heard from from a great videographer, and he started way back when in film. And he was lamenting about the advent of videotape. And now it’s all digital, that people may not be as careful with their shots. Because you can get as many as you want. Right? When you used to have film, you had to be very careful how you set up your shots because you only had so much film to edit together. Do you think that maybe you’re in your profession, it’s gotten better over the years? Or has technology actually heard, technology has gotten so much better that you don’t have to put the time and effort to get a decent shot, let alone something pretty meaningful? You know, I used to walk around with a couple of 20 minute tapes, knowing that you know Bigfoot might run out of the woods and want to do an interview. But if I didn’t have, you know, 10 spare minutes on a tape, it wasn’t happening. Whereas today,

you know, everything’s on a on a hard drive or on a card. And it really doesn’t matter. No matter the format, I think because of the fact that I operated during the 20 minute tape days, when I come back from a story regardless of what it is, I always assumed it seemed to have recorded around 33 clips 33 little tabs of video. I don’t know why that’s something my brain knows that when I hit about 33 clips in I can stop. And I think that’s mainly because I’m used to budgeting my time and effort because of physical media.

Brad Grantham
You have a lot of PR professionals out there who don’t truly understand what goes into being a photojournalist everyday and the demands that you have, on an average day. 20 years ago, you may have said all right, Stuart and x reporter, we want you to turn one package, which is a minute and 25 second story. And then we need to do shoot a bow sock, which is that same story cut down or perhaps a different Mossad somewhere have a voiceover with a soundbite. Today, that’s much different. You’re not just doing one package in one bow side. You’re doing all different types of things, can you? Can you explain what you’re doing an average day?

Stewart Pittman
Yes, whereas years ago, I might be teamed with a reporter and we would be responsible for one minute 15 story. Plus maybe some weather video or like you said a quick soundbite. These days, if I work by myself, I’m responsible for that much and more, more likely, I’m with the reporter. And we’re responsible for two separate minute 30 reports and whatever else along the way we may find, again, technology has made the process so much easier, maybe not better, but easier. And the people in charge of us certainly know that and know what can be done. And like TV managers have since the beginning of time, they just kind of squeeze the limit and get just as much as they can. It doesn’t always lead to higher quality. But it’s amazing what what you can pull off now, I find myself producing an amount of television per day that I couldn’t have fathom when I started. And then I’ll stand on most of it. But when you’re doing two stories a day from two different counties, you know, Something’s got to give. And sometimes the quality is I won’t say the quality suffer so much. But one story gets more attention than the other. And to come back to your area of expertise. If there is a very adept PR person working with me, I can tell you which story is going to get more attention. The one where I’ve got this, as I said invisible facilitator, who’s helping me not writing the story for me not not orchestrating everything, but sort of shoving a buffet of things to warn me that I can choose from.

Brad Grantham
So let’s talk about that effect. Your demands are double or triple what it used to be. So I’ve got an event. And we’re gonna have this press conference out here and your assignment desk or you’ve gotten an email and you’re heading out to my event. You also have three other different things to shoot that day. Right? What can I do to make your job easier by the time you arrive? At my event? What are the three things I need to be thinking of anticipating for you before you even get there?

Stewart Pittman
Well, for television, you’ve got to think like a like a photojournalist, you’ve got to think of the pictures and the sound. And some of it sounds very basic, but it obviously needs to be said because I see such egregious examples of doing it the wrong Way, simple lighting, I made the joke earlier, it’s not very funny one about putting the podium right in front of the plate glass window with the big sun at your back. So it’s so so your speaker’s profile. If PR people don’t need to know anything about photography, just understand what backlight being backlit means, and avoided at all cost, those very basic things. Sound, don’t plan the big press conference in the middle of the chainsaw factory, unless everyone’s going to start making chainsaws for an hour. You know, these days, these are techniques that wouldn’t have worked years ago. But if a PR person can hand me a brochure with a basic facts, that’s certainly something everyone seems to do. These days, if they can direct me towards some pre produced video illustrating their event, I’m not going to use that as my as my video primarily. But if it’s good, and if I don’t have a lot of time, I’m going to use it. And you know, I don’t I don’t want to tell PR people how to write the stories for the news crews. That’s the news crews jobs and and any news crew worth their salt can can see spin and misinformation and you know, look objectively, at the ad the story being presented to them, I don’t want to do the story exactly like the PR guy wants me to. But I want to, I don’t want him calling me up screaming either I want to land somewhere in the middle. So basically, I would say if you’re trying to get on television, if you’re trying to get your message across, think visually, think about video and sound. Certainly, I know everyone in your company wants to get up and say their piece. But and not like that make a great, you know, save reel for the guys in the office. But it ain’t gonna get on television. If if you have some sort of visual demonstration to the side, which may not make for great theater in the room, but gives me something to take a picture of fantastic. And I mean, more than just an artist’s depiction of what the factory will look like. You know, that’s great, I’ll use that. But I can’t, I can’t make that last. As long as I need to warm to things if you want to make the most of having a TV crew in your facility or at your event. Find something. photojournalists love repetitive action, say I’m going to the opening of a new distillery. And there’s a line in the back where they’re bottling the alcohol, that may seem like something you want to shut off during the big event. And certainly when we’re going to talk about everything do so. But if you can fire that assembly line up, and let the camera guy wander around a bit and get all those wonderful sights and sounds of the clinking glasses, and the and the beverage being poured, and the conveyor belt moving. That kind of cinema is exactly what a news crew is looking for. Because it’s more illustrated and more fun to look at, then you’re co thinking everyone in the room. So think like a filmmaker, you know, think of the movie you want to see. And think about how you can present those opportunities to the news crew, the news crew doesn’t so much want to take the three hour walking tour of the factory with all the suits. But if you can pull them aside and escort them to the highlights of it to where the pictures are, then you’re gonna get a much fuller, much better, much longer story. It’s a fine line, you don’t want to overfill produce for someone, but you kind of do.

Chris Shigas
Right. And that’s interesting how you’re talking about, it’s somewhere in the middle, you’re not there to make an ad for the company. But at the same time you’re not trying to embarrass the company or right, purposely make them look bad. I have a question for you because I had an encounter with a videographer. And I’m wondering how I could have handled the situation better. So we were at a trade show. And they were interviewing one of my executives, and where they set up behind my executive was the restroom. And so I you know, and I’ve worked in the newsroom before, so I’m not big on jumping in and this is going to be my production. But at this point I had to jump in. I can’t I can’t, I can’t have my CEO in front of the men’s room. So I said, Hey, why don’t we shifted over this way and that I just don’t want to get the men’s room in the way and the videographer got offended. Sure. Every being that Oh, the men’s room wasn’t in my shot, you know, kind of thing. And yeah, and maybe, maybe there was a more tactful way for me to possibly suggest a different background.

Stewart Pittman
I don’t know it may have been a more tactful way for him to handle that. Because, you know, I think he thought great, I got one job and you’re trying to take it from me. You know, I’m a guy, I’m a guy I don’t get I don’t get to decide anything but I decide what the shot goes. And very often as you know when you’re doing an interview, nine times out of 10 when I’m doing a an interview, I’ve knocked the background so out of focus, right he can’t see anything. But if that was the case, there was a better way for him to show you You know, I’ve everyone knows what it feels like to have a PR guy over your shoulder looking at the viewfinder. Yeah, you know, as long as you’re not bumping my shot, you know, or blowing smoke in my face. That’s cool. Like you just said, you know, I’m not there to embarrass you or, you know, expose, you offer fakes local news, especially. And I have neighbors who know that I work in news and asked me all these questions. And you know, everyone’s convinced that that every news group has an angle or a motive or a slant. And of course, these days, you can find the slant of your choice 1000 places, but most local news crews don’t have an agenda. They’re just trying to keep the commercials from bumping into each other. We’re just trying to create content to get through our day, I want to make a coherent, cinematically free story, that’s my motivation. The downside, I could give a flip about your factory. I mean, I’m a citizen, I want it to succeed. But very often, people assume we have far more sinister motives than we do. My motive is usually make exceptionally good television and get lunch. And that sounds simplistic, but you know, if it’s true understand that, you know, we’re far less sophisticated than then people might give us credit for, if that makes sense.

Chris Shigas
Yeah, and you’re not fake news?

Stewart Pittman
No, um, you know, I get I have relatives who, you know, will will flood my Facebook page with Happy Birthday notices every year, and every other day of the year rebel against the fake news media. And I don’t I guess they don’t make the connection. I’m pretty hard to offend. But you kind of get in there with that. So it’s a crazy New World. You know, I’ve said before on my blog, guys in handcuffs used to slow their roll round me Say Hi, mom. Great. All right, now I’ve got grandmother’s flipping me off. Because I’m fake news. And I’m the same flub with a little thinner hair that always was. So it’s, that’s a whole nother subject, but it’s, um, the things that changed a great deal. And you have to be aware of that. And even with that in mind, you know, people are people and I don’t have any trouble moving in and out of all kinds of unseemly circumstances that don’t involve PR people. Normally, if I’m in a place where there’s a, there’s a PR person, I’m thrilled because, you know, I’m not in a janky part of town, you know, going up some widow’s porch, asked her about her husband. So if I’m at the line, yeah, if I’m somewhere that’s civilized enough to have a PR person there. I’ve already won that day. Oh, I love that, quote,

Chris Shigas
civilized enough to have a PR person there. I

Brad Grantham
love that.

Chris Shigas
That will go on our website. I’ll tweet that.

Brad Grantham
I remember, in another state, when the governor or the economic development people would have these press conferences announcing, you know, hey, we’re got 800 jobs, and we’re putting it here this that the other, the governor’s stuff was so repetitive, it came a drinking game amongst the photographers secretly, like, you know, the best and brightest. Alright, there’s one. Yeah, there’s that the other eight seems like the majority of positive PR stories that we see on local news, or regional news is about economic impacts jobs coming into the region, especially over the past year, we’ve seen quite a lot of other things in this world that have been negative. In your mind, is there any way to spice up those events, those announcements to make it more impactful? Like that PR person? I think you alluded to this a little bit earlier, but like they have a map, or a drawing of what’s coming? Well, could they do a 3d video ahead of time to actually show animation to show what that facility will look like? What are some things like that that could potentially spice up those major announcements? I think, you know, the, for the corporate PR folks listening, and this is something they really need to listen to.

Stewart Pittman
Well, it’s it’s simple, but it may be the hardest thing to find. And that is to find an emotional human element connection. You’re opening a new factory, it’s a state of the art place you want to show me all the whiz bang animation and artists depictions of how this facility is just going to be the greatest thing since sliced bread. That’s all well and good. If you’re putting together a pamphlet to show your boss better yet get me um, you know, have someone there who’s a new employee who is thrilled to be there making the sausage machines and whose life has now changed because of their new job. I mean, don’t show me it’s it’s the same rules when you go to a house fire, you know, get four or five shots of the house fire, but then for God’s sakes, turn around and get a shot of the people watching your fire holding their dog trembling. That’s the stories the person affected. So no matter what, and I’m making, I’m simplifying things but no matter the messenger Trying to get attention on the news, the easiest way to do it is to tap in to emotion and and to put a human face on it. And sometimes that’s easier than other places. Depending on what it is you’re you’re trying to present but, but nothing gets on television longer and faster, like something sad or happy something, you know, let me give me an old lady to get a close up of the tear coming down her cheek about how this thing is so wonderful. That sounds cheesy, that sounds overwrought. But it’s the exact kind of thing you would stop to watch if you were passing by the television, as opposed to an artist’s depiction of a fancy building that doesn’t exist yet. put a face on it.

Chris Shigas
And you there are times where you’re not paired up with reporter where you’re the reporter as well as the videographer, right? So they send you out to do a story on your own. And maybe even if it’s just a VOB, that you have to go and get some B roll and then you have to get a soundbite. And you have to bring it back from a PR people when you’re in that situation. And they’re usually rushed, right? Because that’s not the only thing you’re doing that day. What do you appreciate from the PR person? Do you like to get a press kit? Do you like to get an email with the information you need? Like, like, what’s helpful to you?

Stewart Pittman
Well, I think the most helpful thing to to think about is this, you know, it’s it’s a PR event, it’s inside, there’s been a lot of thought put into it. Everyone’s dressed to the nines. Here I come in, I’m 53 years old, as average looking, as you can imagine, I’m a little rumpled because I’m carrying 100 pounds of stuff. This is the fifth thing I’ve done that day. I’m just happy to be inside, you know, there’s cookies and drinks all the better. But yeah, very often, I can walk into a room and start setting up my camera and no one talks to me. And they don’t realize that that even though I’m not on camera for a reason, I’m there to collect all the information. And I guess what I’m trying to say is PR people need to look at that slubby camera guy a little differently. Because say the reporters late and going to come join if anyone at all, the television reporter is 25 years old, living in an apartment uptown and never goes between anywhere but between work and home and is just learning how to get around and and where she can go on Uber, that schlubby photographer has lived in that town 30 years as a house in the suburbs. A kid in college, a kid in high school is way way more plugged in than than the young journalists just passing through. So I mean, the reporters green from another market, we’re worried about putting on their makeup first stand up, right? Sure. He photons got a mortgage, you know, and and a PTA conference he doesn’t want to go to later. So those those men and women who are in local news, who have sort of planted themselves and are raising their kids, and in a market where they will work at a TV station for 10 1520 years. They are absolute gold mines and a smart PR person will introduce themselves to those people give those people a card and realize that’s the person who can be a conduit to get my message on screen. Because every day that person has to come up with new content. So basically, you know, don’t treat the the photojournalist the photographer’s as just a technician because very often, they’re they are technician, but they’re also journalists, we’re all a little smarter than we look. And we’re very used to speaking to people in all sorts of situations. A funny thing is, people are always PR people are always shoving that I’m that shiny folder full of information in my hand. Yeah. And I’m grateful to get it because, you know, even though there’s the internet now, you know, I tend to truck that if if I can hand that off to my people to get off my plate. But I can’t tell you how many times someone’s shoving a shiny folder at me and I have nowhere to put it. I got a camera. I got a tripod, I got a bag and I want that shiny folder. But where the hell do I put it? How do I carry it out of the room, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had to run back once I load everything. So if we could find a way to make that shiny folder easier to carry around, that

Chris Shigas
would be a way to do it could be a thumb drive, right?

Stewart Pittman
I’ve had that and certainly speaking of that, you know like I said earlier if if these days so many PR entities, you know have their own video had their own YouTube channels have their own production units. I’ve gotten a pride of my product I’m not going to use your your pre made content to constitute most of my story. But if it’s good I am and if I’m doing two stories that day, a lot of it’s going to show up on there but these days it’s easier than ever. People aren’t handing the videotape their their their their email emailing me a link. Yeah, it’s so much easier. I think because of the the eradication of physical media everything is a link everything is you know click the click the and that way I can Get a lot more content into a single TV story, you know, than I used to. And so there’s a strong online element. Now that that makes good television to,

Brad Grantham
what if they presented you this information in a fanny pack? That way, you can just literally flip it around your waist and walk out as you’re carrying everything out?

Stewart Pittman
I will, I will totally,

Brad Grantham
totally do that. Okay, all PR professionals, fanny packs from this point forward with all the relevant information, put your corporate logo in there. You know, as you’re talking, as you’re talking about the shooting, you know, of these press conferences and everything else, half the stuff you’re doing now is virtual, like xootr, or Microsoft Teams or something like that? How would you what would be the simplest tips, you can give a PR pro or perhaps communications professional, if they’re about to do an interview with you, or another entity, through zoom, social media, Facebook, what have you as far as the lighting goes, because I see so many interviews that are either completely in the dark, or, you know, I’m sure you watch television or social media store, you just kind of roll your eyes, you want your professionals to look good, you want them to sound good, you want them to be any distractions. So hopefully, they’ll be the simplest tips that you would give people who are doing virtual interviews.

Stewart Pittman
Well, I don’t want to propagate one company’s product over another. But I wish I had invested in the ring light a couple of years ago, because I see those everywhere I have a daughter who’s on Twitch, doing her seems just work and we got her stream light, and we got our ring light, and it’s worked perfect. But any sort of soft light source, whether it be something you’d buy online, like a ring light, or even a table lamp with the shade removed, or even a window, you want a primary source of light, somewhere off to the side of the camera with a nice puddle of light on your face. Nothing fancy. As you can see right here, I’ve got a window light homey, which I can make look prettier. But it’s funny zooms going to be the death of the TV, news cameraman woman, because why would I need to turn on my stuff all the way up up your stairs, your building, when we can do it like we’re doing now. So only in eight months, I’ve seen that shift with with COVID. Everyone wants to fancy background with the awards and the Emmy and whatever it may be. And that’s all well and good. But if you’re doing a zoom, it’s not about the background, make the background is soft, and maybe out of focus. Don’t sit right up against the back of a wall where you’re backed up to the wall, put some space between you in the background, a nice soft light on your face. It doesn’t have to be a fancy light, but just some sort of soft illumination. Try and make the background darker than the foreground. It sounds simple, but it does wonders.

Brad Grantham
These days, we do a lot with zoom. I work with a couple of reporters during a day. And they have acquired all the interviews themselves from their apartment via zoom. And themselves have edited, edited it. And all I do is meet them for their own camera part. So zoom and teams and that kind of video conferencing is changing the game quickly. I pray that COVID won’t last forever. But I know that will never go back to the way it was 100% zoom. And that kind of thing is not going away when an interview is going bad when you’ve got a congressman, when you’ve got a senator who is accused of certain things, and you have them in the room, and your reporter is asking those tough questions. And that’s person that is being interviewed is just going all over the place or they’re sweating or you know, you can tell they don’t lie to the question. The interview is just going south big time. What would be your advice to that PR person how to get out of that kind of unscathed? Or is there a way

Stewart Pittman
there’s a hard way to do it gracefully because if an interview is going south, I as a photojournalist I’m more interested in ever, you know, I’ve woken up from my days behind the camera, I realized things are not going well. I’m prepared to capture it all. I’m more in the game than ever. So the worst thing a PR person can do is, is come in and clumsily add to the spectacle. I honestly, honestly, and I’m sure people do it, I would establish some sort of sign or to have my speaker stop talking. If I was off camera was just giving them some sort of sign less is more, less is more. And a good example of that is a 60 minutes with Trump. You know, they made such hay of that story going south, you know, that’s that whole thing became the story about the interview. The best thing 60 minutes ever did, or you know easiest thing they ever did. And the PR people can try their best not to add to that add to the spectacle make the bad messaging stop, but don’t make it worse by giving the camera more to

Chris Shigas
take. Hey, Ben, perhaps I mean, from our perspective, the best way to deal with that is preparation beforehand and to practice how to handle those difficult questions. So make sure we’re ready.

Stewart Pittman
Right, right. And and no one no one wants to be in that small world. room where the interview is going bad. That’s, I’ve found myself wanting to pull the fire alarm before just to make it stop, because it can get uncomfortable. Stuart, as we wrap up this version of PR wars, I want to ask you this question. And that is, what are the worst characteristics of a PR person that you encountered, like a memorable one that from an event or anything else that stood out in your mind, like, oh, and these are his characteristics, but at the same time, what are the positive were the most positive characteristics of a person you’ve encountered from the public relations field? In my experience, a lot of public relations people are HTV people, not all of them. But some of them. I like it when the PR person thinks more like a filmmaker, as opposed to a movie star. Now, we’ve all have had PR people who are the shyest people in the room. And they’re great communicators, and you thought they could host their own game show and God loves maybe one day they will. But they don’t need to be the star of the show. You know, I would much rather talk to the CEO as well as the lady on the factory line because they’re hopefully more authentic. So I think the worst thing a PR person can do is try and rack up that screen time. I’m thinking of even people like a like a public information officer for a public school, who’s going to be on camera relentlessly over and over and over again. You know, we get enough of them. So I’ve had a lot of problems with either PR people being like I said earlier, helicopter parents who, right during the interview, during the best part of the interview, are the ladies going to say the best thing they swoop in and try and change something. So there’s a little bit of trust that people need need to give their news crews. inversely, the best PR people are those who are ones who are thinking like a cinematographer, because their goal that day is to get their message on television. So if only for that day alone, they need to think like a TV producer. And that is how can I illustrate my story? How can I present compelling sound bites and tap into some kind of emotion to sell present this thing, Idea Factory campaign, whatever. It all boils down to human emotion. And the best PR people are the ones who understand that who don’t have much interest in stealing the limelight or being on TV. The best PR people television wise are the ones who never go on camera. The ones who do sometimes, you know that gets a little carried away but the best PR people are those invisible facilitators who are orchestrating moments for my camera to capture

Chris Shigas
Stewart Pittman. Thank you so much for being on PR wars today.

Stewart Pittman
Thanks for having me.

Chris Shigas
Remember, you can listen to a new episode of PR wars every Sunday night at 8pm eastern. On behalf of Brad Grantham and this entire PR wars operation, we thank Stewart Pittman, veteran photojournalist now with WCNC-TV Charlotte and do me a favor. When you have a press conference. Introduce yourself to the photogs a little respect can go a long way to helping you capture the best news hit of your career. Now go get ’em.

PR Wars was selected as a Top PR Podcast You Must Follow in 2020 by Feedspot.

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